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How to improve the Pace of Play at a Charity Golf Tournament?


Improve charity golf tournament pace of play

Golf is a sport renowned for its leisurely pace, provides ability to foster camaraderie among players and offers a great way to develop relationships. However, when it comes to charity golf tournaments, expediting the game becomes paramount. A quicker pace ensures a more enjoyable experience for all participants and contributes to the overall success of your charity golf tournament. In this blog post, we will explore some practical tips and strategies to enhance the pace of play at your charity golf tournament, ensuring that everyone has an extraordinary experience while exceeding your fundraising goals.


setting up the golf course

Schedule a meeting with the golf course superintendent prior to your tournament to discuss the golf course set up. Ask the superintendent for an easy course set up with the golf holes in the center of green. The Par 3's need to be short and the Par 5's need to be long. Many charity golf tournaments slow down because golfers want to reach the Par 5 holes in 2 shots. This delay will be eliminated with a long par 5 and will improve pace of play.


blind tee shots

Ask the head golf professional if the golf course has any blind tee shots. Are there any holes where you cannot see your tee shot land on the fairway? Place a volunteer in a safe location on the fairway to spot the tee shots and assist the golfers in locating their golf balls. This will avoid delays from golfers searching for lost golf balls. Have some fun with the volunteer and provide a hard hat with your tournament logo.


par is your friend

If your team is consistently putting for a bogey in a charity golf tournament scramble, let's face it, you are not going to win! Speed up play by implementing the "Par is Your Friend" rule. If a team is putting for bogey, they can pick up their golf balls and move to the next hole. The maximum score each team can make is a par on each hole.


scramble format

Keep your tournament simple and fast by playing a gross scramble format at your charity golf tournament. Scramble format involves 4-person teams where each player on the team hits a tee shot, and then the players decide which shot they like better. All players then play from that spot. This continues until the hole out and will improve pace of play at your charity golf tournament.


limit mulligans

Implement a maximum of 2 mulligans each player can purchase at registration. This will limit the number of second shots throughout your tournament and greatly increase your charity golf tournament's pace of play.


avoid 5-somes

Adding a 5th player to each team will slow down your charity golf tournament - guaranteed! Are you planning a celebrity golf tournament with a celebrity to join each team? If so, sell teams in 3-somes instead of 4-somes and add a celebrity to each team to create the 4-some.


marshal the tournament

Ask the golf course if you can hire a staff member to marshal the pace of play during your charity golf tournament. The marshal can assist players in maintaining pace, provide gentle reminders about slow play, and help with any questions or issues that may arise during the tournament. It is important that the marshal is a staff member of the golf course and not a volunteer.


improve pace of play at your charity golf tournament

A charity golf tournament is a remarkable way to raise funds for a meaningful cause while enjoying a day of golfing with friends, colleagues, and supporters. By implementing these tips to improve the pace of play, you can ensure that your tournament runs smoothly, leaving participants with a positive experience and a desire to return for future tournaments. Remember, a well-organized and efficiently paced charity golf tournament is not only enjoyable but also significantly contributes to the success of the fundraising efforts! Want to learn more producing an extraordinary charity golf tournament? Reach out today to schedule a free consultation.


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